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News and Information about Dogs, Cats, and Pet Products

In my family, Halloween is one of our favorite times of year. The trees are colorful, the kitchen smells like apple cider, and the cutest little ghosts and goblins wander around the neighborhood doing the best to look frightful!

10431249_791800060866672_1675487833336778634_oBut while we humans are having such a fun time, that’s often not the case for our furry friends.  The sound of a repeatedly ringing doorbell can send some dogs and cats scrambling for cover. Unfamiliar holiday visitors can cause excessive anxiety. For these situations, the Thundershirt and Happy Traveler, by Ark Naturals can be a huge help! See our past blog: Thundershirt + Happy Traveler = Stress Free Summer to learn more about these two products.

The scarier aspect of Halloween, from a pet perspective: the fact that tiny trick-or-treaters may decide to “share” some of their Halloween goodies with your four-legged friends. Even when the trick-or-treaters aren’t so tiny, their treat baskets can often wind up unattended, or in easy-to-reach places.  I can tell you, that when this happens the frantic trip to the emergency vet is NOT pretty.

So, as Halloween is just around the corner, it is worth remembering some especially menacing food culprits to keep away from our beloved pets:

Chocolate ~ In ANY form, this is extremely toxic to your dog or cat. It contains high levels of caffeine and theobromine – both of which are hard for cats and dogs to process.  The darker the chocolate, the more dangerous.

Grapes and Raisins ~ Humans often think of these as healthy Halloween alternatives. But for dogs and cats — they will cause kidney failure.DogToxins

Xylitol ~ This no-calorie sweetener is often used in sugar-free gum and certain baked products. In many dogs and cats, it can cause a sever, and sudden, life-endangering drop in blood sugar levels.

Ethanol (including Ethyl Alcohol, Grain Alcohol or Drinking Alcohol) ~ Even small amounts of this compound can cause life-threatening toxicity in dogs and cats – and don’t forget, flavor syrups and raw yeast bread dough often contain it too.

At Two Bostons we have several pet-safe alternatives for your dogs and cats to still enjoy Halloween Festivities.  Check out our bakery case, Puppy Kisses or other sweet treats!

Almost everyone knows that chocolate is bad for dogs…But is it really true, and what does it really do?  Well with Valentine’s Day is just around the corner, I thought I would clear the air for you!

YES, Chocolate really is poison to dogs.  I know that it is difficult to believe that something so amazing could be so deadly to our four-legged friends.

So why is it so bad you ask? Chocolate contains theobromine.  This is a naturally occurring stimulant found in the cocoa bean, and that is what is poisonous to dogs.  Theobromine affects the central nervous system, the heart muscle and it increases urination.dog-eating-chocolate

What are the signs? First know that the longer the chocolate is in your dog’s system, the more theobromine they will absorb.  Within the first few hours, the symptoms includes vomiting, diarrhea, or hyperactivity. You will begin to see an increase in heart rate, this is bad because it causes arrhythmia, restlessness, hyperactivity, muscle twitching, increased urination or excessive panting.  These symptoms can lead to hypothermia, muscle tremors, seizures, coma and even death.

But how much Chocolate? Just like most things…Not all chocolate is created equal.  The age and relative health of your dog is going to be a factor on how severely your dog will react to eating chocolate.  Here is a breakdown of the different types of chocolate poisoning for a generally healthy, average age dog:

 

  • White Chocolate: 200 ounces per pound of body weight.  It takes 250 pounds of white chocolate to cause signs of poisoning in a 20 pound dog; 125 pounds for a 10 pound dog.
  • Milk Chocolate: 1 ounce per pound of body weight. Approximately one pound of milk chocolate is poisonous to a 20 pound dog; one-half pound for a 10 pound dog.  The average chocolate bar contains 2 to 3 ounces of milk chocolate.  It would take approximately 2-3 candy bars to poison a 10 pound dog.
  • Semi-Sweet Chocolate: has a similar toxic level.  Sweet cocoa: 0.3 ounces per pound of body weight.  One-third of a pound of sweet cocoa is toxic to a 20 pound dog; one-sixth of a pound for a 10 pound dog.
  • Baking Chocolate: 0.1 ounce per pound body weight.  Two one-ounce squares of bakers’ chocolate is toxic to a 20 pound dog; one ounce for a 10 pound dog.  Source

 

two-bostons-carob-puppy-kissespawsitively-gourmet-hearts-pink-and-brownWe do have a SAFE alternatives to satisfy your dogs chocolate cravings on Valentine’s Day and everyday! Our Bakery Treats and our most popular treat, Puppy Kisses, that look and taste like chocolate actually are made with, Carob.

Carob has the same great chocolate taste to our dogs, without the fear!  Carob is actually a nutritious alternative as it contains 8% protein and traces of vitamin A, B, B2, and B3 and D.  Carob is high in phosphorous, potassium, magnesium, iron and calcium. These vitamins and minerals are vital in the promotion of healthy bones, teeth, eyes and coat.

I hope that this will clear up any questions about Dogs and Chocolate…if you have any other questions always feel free to ask one our Team Members! Happy Valentine’s Day!

Beckie Schuerenberg is the content coordinator for Two Bostons. She and her family adopted their cat, Maggie, in September.

Beckie Schuerenberg is the content coordinator for Two Bostons. She and her family adopted their cat, Maggie, in September.

Has your pet been good this year? Or has she been a little on the naughty side?

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Even if she’s given you a bit of trouble–as most pets do–it’s fun to put up a stocking just for them as you prepare for your holiday festivities.

Some pet parents prefer to have a stocking for Fido that is more traditional, like the common red with white trim style that matches the rest of their family’s stockings. While others may want something more unique that matches their–or their pet’s–personality. 

No matter what your preference, Two Bostons has a variety of pet stockings in stock to match your needs. For example, we have some cute stockings from kyjen that are more of that traditional plain red and white style, but also have a cute festive pawprint on the bottom to ensure Santa knows to fill this one with some of our yummy Puppy Kisses!

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We also have some wonderful unique stocking designs all custom made by a local artist with patterns that will please any pet lover, from stripes and flowers to camouflage and even the popular damask pattern.

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These fun stockings come with a felt gift tag that can be labeled with your pet’s name. They also can be stuffed with toys and treats as a gift idea for another pet lover in your life.

No time to stuff stockings this year? Two Bostons has already filled some of these colorful stockings full of yummy, healthy treats for your pooch, as well as some great toys to help keep them occupied while you are opening your own stockings this holiday season.

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So no matter what your style or timeframe, don’t forget to hang a stocking for your dogs–and kitties–this year. Maybe, just maybe it will remind them to be good throughout next year!

 

Beckie Schuerenberg is the content coordinator for Two Bostons. She and her family adopted their cat, Maggie, in September.

Beckie Schuerenberg is the content coordinator for Two Bostons. She and her family adopted their cat, Maggie, in September.

If you are like me, you have a LOT of Halloween candy still lying around. And although we recently ran a blog post about keeping your pet safe ON Halloween, we’d like to now focus on keeping your pet safe AFTER the holiday with all that candy in the house.

Most animals are curious and want to be around for many Halloween traditions such as the candy dumps, sorts and gorges that take place after the holiday is over. But most human candy–including those fun-size chocolates and other sugar-coated treats–that kids (and adults) love, can be dangerous to animals.

So if you have leftover goodies lying around, it’s best to keep them high up and hidden away so your pups can’t be tempted. With their keen sense of smell, many dogs and cats might be able to locate any candy that’s bagged up on a counter or a desk and tear into it while no one is looking. dogeatingcandyOr they may want gobble up any items leftover in wrappers lying around or in the trash, so take extra precautions over the next few days and weeks to make sure your pooch stays clear of any candy.

But you don’t have to leave your dog out completely of the fun Halloween tradition of eating goodies. Two Bostons has lots of yummy, safe, treats–including holiday themed ones–that your dog is sure to appreciate. In addition to our line of Buddy Biscuits, which come in a variety of flavors, including peanut butter, bacon and cheese, sweet potato and chicken,

we offer other healthy treats, including Grandma Lucy’s organic treats, which come in apple, and banana and sweet potato.

Also, our delectable bakery items are sure to please your pup when it’s treat time at your house. In addition to our line of Puppy Kisses, which come in peanut butter, yogurt and carob flavors,

we have lots of seasonal baked goods for your pooch to enjoy while you (or your child) are diving into that Halloween candy.

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And as November marches on, check our bakery cases for more yummy Thanksgiving and Christmas holiday-themed treats so you can be sure to include your pooch in these food-related holidays!

Did you find this post informational? Let us know by posting a comment below!

 

 

 

With Easter candy running rampant in most of our homes we must take extra precautions to make sure our fur friends are safe.

As an educated dog owner, you know that a healthy diet is imperative for your dog’s well being. You also know that feeding your dog appropriate table scraps or “people food” is not the worst thing in the world. However, there is one bit of information that you should not EVER ignore…Chocolate really is poison to dogs.

I know that it is difficult to fathom, that something so delicious to us could be so deadly to our fur buddies. But it is true. Heed the warnings.

I actually, unfortunately, know this from experience. Mr. Pig (long story on the name) was a pure breed German Shepherd dog we had before Diesel. He was a very curious and rambunctious dog, who liked to get into everything. I used to have to put a lock down on the house before leaving because I couldn’t crate him as he would figure out ways to wedge himself under the bars and hurt himself.

One day, I wasn’t as diligent as I thought (although in my defense, the chocolate was ON TOP of our microwave which was ON TOP of our 5 foot tall microwave stand) and he got into a large amount of milk chocolate. I was terrified when I came home and saw the wrappers all over the floor. I immediately called my vet. She told me to try to induce vomiting, which isn’t as easy as it sounds when dealing with a dog, and to get him in to her as soon as I could. I ended up having his stomach pumped. I was terrified that my negligence would kill my dog. It was rough. In the end, he ended up being fine, but let me tell you, that was THE MOST expensive chocolate I’ve ever had!

So what is it about chocolate that is so bad for dogs? Well, chocolate contains theobromine. This is a naturally occurring stimulant found in the cocoa bean, and that is what is poisonous to dogs. Theobromine affects the central nervous system as well as heart muscle and increases urination.

How can you tell if your dog has eaten a toxic dose of chocolate? Well within the first few hours, the symptoms includes vomiting, diarrhea or hyperactivity. The longer the chocolate is in your dog’s system, the more theobromine he will absorb. You will begin to see an increase in heart rate. This is bad because it can cause arrhythmia, restlessness, hyperactivity, muscle twitching, increased urination or excessive panting.

This can lead to hypothermia, muscle tremors, seizures, coma and even death.

Know this…not all chocolate is created equal. And, the age and relative health of your dog is going to be a deciding factor on just how severely your dog will react to eating chocolate. The following chart gives you an idea of chocolate poisoning for a generally healthy, average age dog:

  • White chocolate: 200 ounces per pound of body weight. It takes 250 pounds of white chocolate to cause signs of poisoning in a 20-pound dog, 125 pounds for a 10-pound dog.
  • Milk chocolate: 1 ounce per pound of body weight. Approximately one pound of milk chocolate is poisonous to a 20-pound dog; one-half pound for a 10-pound dog. The average chocolate bar contains 2 to 3 ounces of milk chocolate. It would take 2-3 candy bars to poison a 10 pound dog.
  • Semi-sweet chocolate has a similar toxic level. Sweet cocoa: 0.3 ounces per pound of body weight. One-third of a pound of sweet cocoa is toxic to a 20-pound dog; 1/6 pound for a 10-pound dog.
  • Baking chocolate: 0.1 ounce per pound body weight. Two one-ounce squares of bakers’ chocolate is toxic to a 20-pound dog; one ounce for a 10-pound dog. Source

There is a safe alternative for your pooch. Carob is a substitute you can offer your dog as a treat without the fear and worry that chocolate possesses. It is actually a nutritious alternative as it contains 8% protein and traces of vitamin A, B, B2, B3 and D. Carob is also high in phosphorous, potassium, magnesium, iron and calcium. These vitamins and minerals are vital in the promotion of healthy bones, teeth, eyes and coat.

Next time you want to give your pal a treat, consider our Puppy Kisses. They are our most popular treat! The trio contains carob, yogurt, and peanut butter discs and the flavors are sold in individual containers as well.

Please learn from my mistake and keep your chocolate well out of reach. For the sake of everyone’s health and safety, we should really only see the words “chocolate” and “dog” together in the following context: