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News and Information about Dogs, Cats, and Pet Products

It looks like this weekend Summer is going to be heating up…which is a good time to remind pet-parents about the dangers of Heat Stroke in our four-legged friends. Could you imagine wearing a winter coat when it is 90° outside? That is what it is like for them during the summer.

What is Heat Stroke?

Heat stroke is a term used for hyperthermia or elevated body temperature. If your pet’s body temperature is at 103°F or above, that is considered abnormal or hyperthermic. When the body temperature reaches 106°F without previous signs of illness and is most commonly associated with exposure to excessive heat that is often referred to as heat stroke.

What Causes Heat Stroke?

Many people believe that heat stroke is limited to when a dog is confined in a small or enclosed place during high temperatures, such as a car. Yes, this can be the most common cause but there are also many others. Your dog can be affected by moving from cool places (like the A/C in the house or car) to outside. Extreme exercise and outdoor play can induce heat stroke as well.

What are the Symptoms of Heat Stroke?

  • Unexplained Restlessness
  • Excessive Panting
  • Fluctuating Panting
  • Excessive Drooling
  • Foaming at the Mouth
  • Dry or Tacky Gums
  • Difficulty Breathing
  • Agitation, Whining, Anxiety

If you notice any of the signs listed above, work quickly to cool your dog and get in touch with your Vet as soon as possible.

How to Prevent Heat Stroke?

The number one way to prevent heat stroke is PLENTY of WATER! Shade is also a must if you are outside in the heat for extended periods of time. It is also important to limit your walks and play outside to the early morning and late evening hours. Having a Gulpy Water Dispenser by Kyjen is an easy way to keep your pup hydrated while out on hot days!

Remember, dogs don’t release heat from their bodies as well as humans do. Heat stroke is a very real (and sometimes fatal) risk this time of year. By keeping your furry friend cool, giving access to plenty of water, and limit large fluctuations in temperature, you will help avoid the dangers of heat stroke this (and every) summer.

 

 

Fan-DogSummer is often an enjoyable season for people and pets…However hot weather can be uncomfortable for people and animals alike. When you feel the temperatures rise, think about how you would feel wearing a fur coat. If it is too hot for you, it is too hot for your dog. The following are some summer safety to insure you and your pooch have a happy, healthy summer.

  • Always provide plenty of cool, fresh water.
  • When outside, make sure there is shade available that your dog can rest in.
  • Take your dog for a walk in the early morning or in the evening when temperatures are cooler.  Also avoid walking on asphalt as it can be much hotter than other surfaces and burn the pads on your dog’s feet.
  • Heartworm is a deadly disease which is transmitted by mosquitoes. Be sure to discuss with your veterinarian heartworm testing and preventative. Flea and tick preventative should be discussed as well.
  • Never leave your dog in a closed car on a hot day. Even with the windows cracked, the temperature inside the car escalates to high temperatures very quickly.  Not only is this extremely dangerous and fatal for your dog, it is also against the law.  Play it safe and leave your dog at home if you think you might have to leave him in the car.
  • Water safety for dogs has many similarities to water safety for children.  Never throw a dog into the water, especially if it is their first attempt at swimming.  Introduce them slowly in shallow water to insure a positive experience. Dogs should always wear a flotation device when they are on a boat. Do not leave dogs unattended by pools or bodies of water.  Not all dogs are good swimmers and those that are can tire out quickly.
  • Brachycephalic dogs such as Bulldogs and Pugs have a harder time breathing and panting so keep these types of dogs out of the heat and in the air conditioning.panting
  • The heat can also be harder on overweight and senior pets so they should also be kept in the air conditioning as much as possible.
  • Know the signs of overheating! Early symptoms of heatstroke include rapid breathing and excessive drooling.  Advanced symptoms include white gums, lethargy, and shock. If you suspect your dog is overheating, immediately try to cool him down and contact your veterinarian.
  • Most dogs are scared of fireworks. The loud noise can startle your dog and cause him to run off. Or a curious dog might get injured by getting too close to a firecracker or sparkler. Please leave them at home or inside when taking part in Fourth of July celebrations.

AnnaPaytonFor more information on how to keep your pet safe this summer, ask any Two Bostons Team Member or consult your veterinarian.

Anna Payton is the Executive Director at the Naperville Area Humane Society.  Visit them at www.napervilleareahumanesociety.org; follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter @NaperHumane

 

 

With the temperatures rising through the end of July and into August, I thought it would be a great time to remind you about the very real dangers of Heat Stroke to our four-legged friends.  Could you imagine wearing your winter coat right now? That is what it is like for them during the summer.

 

Panting_xlibberWhat is Heat Stroke?

Heat stroke is a term used for hyperthermia or elevated body temperature.  If your pet’s body temperature is at 103°F or above that is considered abnormal or hypothermic.  When the body temperature reaches 106°F without previous signs of illness and is most commonly associated with exposure to excessive heat that is often referred to as heat stroke.

 

 

What Causes Heat Stroke?

Temperature-in-Car-GaugeMany people believe that heat stroke is limited to when a dog is confined in a small or enclosed place during high temperatures, such as a car.  Yes, this can be the most common cause but there are also many others.  Your dog can be affected by moving from cool places (like the A/C in the house or car) to outside.  Extreme exercise and outdoor play can induce heat stroke as well.

 

What are the Symptoms of Heat Stroke?

  1. Unexplained Restlessness
  2. Excessive Panting
  3. Fluctuating Panting
  4. Excessive Drooling
  5. Foaming at the Mouth
  6. Dry or Tacky Gums
  7. Difficulty Breathing
  8. Agitation, Whining, Anxiety

If you notice any of the signs listed above, work quickly to cool your dog and get in touch with your Vet as soon as possible.

 

How to Prevent Heat Stroke?

The number one way to prevent heat stroke is PLENTY of WATER!  Shade is also a must if you are outside in the heat for extended periods of time.  It is also important to limit your walks and play outside to the early morning and late evening hours too.  Having a cool spot to lie in the house will also work wonders!  If you have not seen our Canine Cooler Mat, you need to check this out today!

 

Remember dogs don’t release heat from their bodies as well as humans do.  Heat stroke is a very real (and sometimes fatal) risk this time of year.  But, by keeping your furry friend cool, giving access to plenty of water, and taking care to limit large fluctuations in temperature, you will help avoid the dangers of heat stroke this (and every) summer.