Shop Online  |  My Account  |  Customer Care  |  Order Status
View Cart  | 
Search:

News and Information about Dogs, Cats, and Pet Products

Taurine is one of those things you’ve probably seen mentioned all over the place lately but when you go to research, every article you find is written in medical gibberish. Fear not, pet parents, we’re here to break down exactly what it is and why your pet needs it–no dictionary required!

In a nutshell:¬†Taurine is an amino acid that is exclusively found in animal-based proteins. It works to keep our pets’ bodies functioning properly, especially for normal vision, heart health, digestion, and reproduction.

Why it matters: While cats and dogs naturally can produce taurine, dogs just barely produce what they need and cats are physically incapable of producing enough to ensure healthy functions. While this might sound a little alarming, your furry friends can get more taurine through their diet!

Where does taurine come from:¬†As mentioned above, taurine only naturally occurs in animal proteins, which is one of the many reasons it’s crucial for your pets to get as much meat as possible! Hearts are especially jam packed with it, but there are also supplements available. Most pet food brands are conscious about the amount of taurine in their recipes and add in additional taurine if necessary.

How to make sure your pet gets enough taurine: Feeding fresh is almost always the answer when it comes to boosting your pet’s health! Even if they only eat two fresh meals a week in addition to their current diet, you’ll see a world of difference in everything from your pet’s coat, energy levels, poop (it’ll become less smelly and smaller!), and, of course, taurine levels. Fresh food is the closest you can possibly get to what an animal would eat in the wild without actually releasing them in the woods to catch their own dinner–that means it has optimal nutritional benefits!

Another option is to start including fresh or freeze dried treats into your pet’s routine. Remember how we said that hearts are one of the best sources of taurine? You can actually feed freeze dried hearts as a yummy snack! Some of our personal favorites are the Freeze Dried Chicken Heart Bites by Fresh Is Best. It’s a single-ingredient snack that’s 100% American-made. They’re even so tasty that both dogs AND cats love them! You can check them out in our stores or order them online here.

You can also easily add daily supplements to your pet’s diet. There are quite a few good ones available but our go-to and most trusted is Herbsmith’s Taurine Boost powder. It’s as simple as adding a spoonful to your pet’s bowl and giving it a quick stir!

 

In conclusion: Taurine isn’t as complicated and scary as the internet makes it out to be!¬† Remember: if you still feel unsure, confused, or have questions, reach out to us. We aren’t kidding when we say we could talk about pet wellness all day!

Have you caught the Bowl Boosting Bug? Check back with us every Tuesday to learn more little ways to add big nutrients to your pets’ bowls!

4 COMMENTS
Marla Black
July 11, 2019
ad

I have a dog thats allergic to chicken everything so would the chicken hearts bother him. I know thats probably a stupid question but didnt know if real freeze dried would be different than compressed into kibble. Thanks for your time

Jill
July 11, 2019
ad

From what I’m learning, the issues people are seeing isn’t just as a result of low or reduced taurine, but also the fact that the Taurine isn’t being absorbed into the system due to certain legumes, etc…that are in the grain free pet foods in abundance. Any word on that part of the issue?
Thanks much.

Two Bostons
July 11, 2019
ad

There is no such thing as a stupid question! It’s always good to be cautious when a pet has an allergy, so we’d suggest trying something different than the chicken hearts. As an alternative, we also carry beef hearts, which are just as great. Check them out here!

Two Bostons
July 11, 2019
ad

Hi Jill! Not sure if you’ve read our write-up on our take on the DCM issue, but you can check that out here. You’ll find some helpful links and statistics that will hopefully answer some questions for you. In terms of the legumes, it’s currently just one of many speculations the FDA has. The actual data that has been released is very, very limited. One of the links is to the FDA’s report, itself, so you can read it straight from the source, but essentially they’re only looking at a sample size of about 500 dogs (out of 87 million that live in the US!), many of which are breeds genetically prone to the disease.

That being said, we know a lot of pet parents out there are feeling uneasy with this whole situation. If you still have concerns, we welcome you to call any of our stores or come pay us a visit. It’s important to us that your dog is eating something that BOTH of you are happy with. -Mary Ann

Post a comment