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News and Information about Dogs, Cats, and Pet Products

It looks like this weekend Summer is going to be heating up…which is a good time to remind pet-parents about the dangers of Heat Stroke in our four-legged friends. Could you imagine wearing a winter coat when it is 90° outside? That is what it is like for them during the summer.

What is Heat Stroke?

Heat stroke is a term used for hyperthermia or elevated body temperature. If your pet’s body temperature is at 103°F or above, that is considered abnormal or hyperthermic. When the body temperature reaches 106°F without previous signs of illness and is most commonly associated with exposure to excessive heat that is often referred to as heat stroke.

What Causes Heat Stroke?

Many people believe that heat stroke is limited to when a dog is confined in a small or enclosed place during high temperatures, such as a car. Yes, this can be the most common cause but there are also many others. Your dog can be affected by moving from cool places (like the A/C in the house or car) to outside. Extreme exercise and outdoor play can induce heat stroke as well.

What are the Symptoms of Heat Stroke?

  • Unexplained Restlessness
  • Excessive Panting
  • Fluctuating Panting
  • Excessive Drooling
  • Foaming at the Mouth
  • Dry or Tacky Gums
  • Difficulty Breathing
  • Agitation, Whining, Anxiety

If you notice any of the signs listed above, work quickly to cool your dog and get in touch with your Vet as soon as possible.

How to Prevent Heat Stroke?

The number one way to prevent heat stroke is PLENTY of WATER! Shade is also a must if you are outside in the heat for extended periods of time. It is also important to limit your walks and play outside to the early morning and late evening hours. Having a Gulpy Water Dispenser by Kyjen is an easy way to keep your pup hydrated while out on hot days!

Remember, dogs don’t release heat from their bodies as well as humans do. Heat stroke is a very real (and sometimes fatal) risk this time of year. By keeping your furry friend cool, giving access to plenty of water, and limit large fluctuations in temperature, you will help avoid the dangers of heat stroke this (and every) summer.

 

 

2 COMMENTS
Tom Trop
June 14, 2018
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This article uses the word “hypothermia”, which is incorrect, as hypothermia is low body temperature. The correct word here is “hyperthermia”.

Lisa Spaeth
June 15, 2018
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Thank you for pointing that out…Darn Auto-correct!

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