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News and Information about Dogs, Cats, and Pet Products

Halloween can be a really stressful time for many dogs. They’ve already had to learn to maneuver an environment dominated by humans and then we have these random days throughout our lives where we do really weird stuff! From loud booms on July 4th to totally creepy creatures during October 31st, our dogs endure a lot of potential stress. A ton of dogs will be dressed up for Halloween as they march in pet parades and accompany their humans door-to-door.  There are good, better, and best ways to dress your dog and there are a few things we just shouldn’t do at all.

I would like to add in a really important one I intended to mention but did forget (you’ll see why in the video!). Please do not ever ride your dog. No matter how large the dog, no matter how small the child. This will set the dog up for a lot of potential mental stress and future health issues.

Happy Halloween!!

 

Amber Walker, KPA CTP, Owner & Trainer, Animal Intuitions, LLC. You can contact Amber at 630-53-PUPPY (630-537-8779),  Amber@aitrainers.com or www.aitrainers.com

 

 

This Saturday (9/30/17) is our 8th Annual Adopt-A-Rama and we are so excited to see adoptable pets find new homes! This event has grown so much over the years and we now have over 20 shelters and rescue that will be attending to educate you on adoption and meet their dogs and cats.

If you already have a pet at home and you want to another, it can sometimes be difficult to know how to go about picking out and introducing a new pet into your home.  Here is a quick checklist of things to look for:

  • Consider the personalities of your existing pet(s), look for a new addition with specific traits. Adopting an older pet has a big advantage – most older pets have already been exposed to other species in their past, which can really streamline the socialization process.
  • If your dog tends to aggressively chase, pin, or otherwise “manhandle” cats, it’s probably best to consider getting another dog instead. And, a cat who constantly growls and bats, or hides from dogs would probably prefer the company of another cat.
  • If you have a pup who loves chasing things, consider avoiding a fearful or shy new addition. This can sometimes trigger a dog to chase.
  • Ignore the old wives’ tail – Bringing a highly energetic, rough-playing pet home could bring “new life” to your existing elderly pet companion. This pairing could actually terrorize or even hurt your older furry friend. Look for an upbeat, but calmer new addition. The extra company can still do wonders for an older animal.
  • Pick a neutral location to introduce your existing pet and the prospective new pet. Pick a somewhat airy, open area that neither pet considers “home turf.”
  • After bringing you new furry friend home, periodically rotate which pet has freedom to roam and which one is more confined for the first few days. This allows each animal plenty of space to investigate the other one’s scent.
  • Never leave two newly-acquainted pets alone together and unsupervised. This should be managed very gradually over about 3-6 weeks.
  • In the case of dogs and cats, the cat will often “claim” higher territory and let the dog “have” the floor spaces. Try adding a few high up perching features (shelves or pieces of furniture) to your living area to help both animals feel comfortable.
  • Don’t hesitate to work with a qualified animal behaviorist who can often suggest very specific and effective strategies for helping new furry family members get comfortable with each other.

If you have other questions about introducing or training a new pet, Allie Bender, owner of Pet Harmony will be on hand at Adopt-A-Rama this weekend to talk to you and answer your questions! We look forward to seeing you on Saturday at Two Bostons, Springbrook from Noon-3:00 pm.

 

The statistics are staggering: Between 25%-35% of cats in the United States are overweight or obese. And this epidemic is more than just a cosmetic issue. Cats are more likely to suffer from arthritis, respiratory disease, and diabetes, among the conditions. These ailments lead to a worsening quality of life, shorter life span, and more expensive medical bills. As the adage goes, ‘an ounce of prevention is worth a pond of cure’, so is true in providing the proper nutrition to your cat. But, with so many options available, choosing the right food for weight management or loss can be daunting enough.

This article, however, will not focus on what is the best food to feed. Creating an ideal feeding plan might be more important than the food choice itself. Consider some of these ‘cat-raptions’:

 

  • A measuring cup can be the simplest tool available to help guide your cat on the pathway to weight loss and takes the ‘guesstimate’ work out on how much to feed. Filling the bowl to the brim and approximating with a ‘handful’ are not acceptable options!  You may be surprised by how much you are really overfeeding your cat. 
  • An automatic feeder can be your best friend, especially if you are not home for hours at a time, or if your cat is an early-riser who pesters you for breakfast. Instead of filling the bowl with a copious supply of kibble, precise amounts of food can be released at various intervals making sure your can does not go hungry. Placing the feeder in an empty bedroom or extra bathroom will make you feel less guilty as your cat ‘pesters’ the automatic feeder rather than you for food.
  • A variety of commercial ‘food puzzles’ (even homemade ones) may be used to not only provide your cat with physical stimulation during feeding, but also contribute to their emotional well being. These puzzles are essentially an object that releases small amounts of food when your cat interacts with them. Cats are natural predators in the wild and will eat multiple small meals per day. Allowing your cat to express their natural instincts at the same time they are ‘foraging’ for food might be as beneficial to their welfare as it is for weight loss.
  • Having multiple cats should not be a roadblock to weight loss! Consider these options: meal feeding, feeding in separate rooms or at different heights, or using a NekoFeeder. This neat device provides ideal weight cats consistent access to their food while keeping those ‘dieting’ cats away. Only cats that wear an electronic key collar are allowed access to the feeder. For more information visit www.nekofeeder.com.

Finally, don’t forget to ask your cat’s veterinarian for advice, an often underutilized resource in feline dietary management! Your veterinarian is also a trusted source to determine the best diet as he/she has received formal training in nutrition as part of their medical education.

Wheatland Animal Hospital is located at 24041 W. 103rd St., Naperville, IL 60564. They can be reached at (630) 904-2020 or visit their website at www.wheatlandanimalhospital.com.

 

 

 

A common concern I receive from parents is their dog ignores their small child (from toddler through grade school, even high school). Whether it is the dog pulling on sleeves and pants or jumping on the children, the bottom line is the dog isn’t listening to anything the child is saying.

Most kids only know how to be kids. Kids are loud, fast, darty, bouncy, goofy, and confusing. All of this is interpreted by the dog in a million different ways. Here are a few of the biggest mistakes I see kids making:

Run Away. Of course a kid isn’t standing there while his dog jumps, nips or chases. The child is going to do what his DNA says to do. Run Away! However, this speaks as more fun for the dog! Instead, we teach children to Be A Tree, while calling or counting loudly. A cue to a parent to intervene quickly. Stop, look at your feet, fold your hands. Start calling loudly to parent. Dogs don’t chase trees. Be A Tree.

Yelling. I frequently hear kids yelling. First they are yelling just because kids can be naturally loud. But that turns into yelling cues to the dog or yelling at the dog to stop the unwanted. Or yelling louder because the dog is ignoring them, but the dog has tuned out the yelling.

Rapid Fire Cues. I hear parents faulty of this but I hear nearly 100% of kids rapid fire at their dog. “Fido! Sit Sit Sit Sit Sit Sit. Fido! Sit. Sit. Sit. Sit. Sit!” Usually including a finger point or sometimes a sharp finger to the dog’s shoulder. The dog tunes out the rapid fire cues, I would tune you out too, if you said, “have a seat on the couch, have a seat on the couch, have a seat on the couch.”

What a dog trainer’s kid does: I started guiding my Little on proper training and interactions around 18 months old with our Hadley, our Yellow Labrador. Up until this point, there was non-stop management and re-direction to keep both kid and dog safe.

Height helps. I used a 2 level step stool. The height helps the kid have some confidence and keeps safe distances from dog to eliminate silly kid reactions if the dog does something unexpected. She would run through our dog’s behaviors with my guidance. Kids love to help with training sessions because they think its magnificent when the dog listens to them. The height also helps the dog learn high value kid treats are tossed to the floor so dog will learn to keep space from kid and turn focus to floor once kid is on the floor.

Delivering cues. She uses both hand cues and verbal cues together. Then she would use only hand and then only verbal. Then she would squeal when Hadley would respond. Ha!

Ask/Wait. My Little learned on the first training session from her stop stool, We ask Hadley ONCE then count to 5 before we ask again. We never rapid fire cues.

Kiss A Hip. My Little always offers our pup love in the morning when she wakes and in the evening before bed, but she will always kiss/hug Hadley’s hip. Never Hadley’s face or mouth. Never her nose or feet. She shows respect to our dog by kissing the least offensive or intimidating part of the dog. The back end!

Stranger Dogs. My daughter would never run up to any dog. She knows to ask permission from the owner before touching. She know to let the dog approach her because not all dogs want to be pet. She knows to pet on the shoulders or hips.

As soon as your child is old enough to understand what you are communicating to them in life, teach them to properly communicate to a dog!

You can contact Amber Walker at (630) 53-PUPPY, amber@aitrainers.com or visit her website www.aitrainers.com.

Keeping your pet at their ideal weight is so important to their health. If your pet is overweight, I strongly urge you to take the steps to start helping them lose the excess pounds.

To see if your do is a their ideal weight, there are 3 areas to check:

(1) Ribs

You should be able to feel your dog’s ribs as if there is a thin blanket over them. You can feel them, but they are not noticeably visible when standing. If you feel a layer of “squish” over this area or can’t feel the ribs at all, your dog is overweight.

(2) Abdominal Tuck

You should notice an upward slope of your dog’s belly from the end of their rib cage to their thighs. If there is barely to no slope here, your dog is overweight.

(3) Waist

From a bird’s eye view, looking down at your dog, you should notice an inward tapering of a waist, just before their rear end. If you can’t make out a waist, or you are noticing more of a sausage shape here, your dog is overweight.

The above 3 areas to check ideal weight are there in EVERY dog.

Extra weight adds extra stress on the joints as well as the rest of the body. It can make them prone to so many different health conditions as well as make it more difficult to recover from injuries. If your pet is overweight, it’s time to start taking the steps to slim them down.

To help your pet lose the extra weight, there are two main areas to look at:

(1) Food

Your dog’s diet is the most influential factor to their weight. Start by cutting back their food, or better yet, look to providing your pet with a better quality food. Keep track of everything that goes into your dog’s mouth everyday. If your dog gets a treat in the day, be sure you account for this at meal time. If you feed a food like kibble or canned food, try going to a less processed food such as a freeze, or best you can feed raw.

Notice the 3 areas to check: ribs, abdominal tuck, and waist spell “raw?” They were put in that order at no mistake! Raw food provides your dog with nutrition in the form their body was designed to recognize and utilize. It will make weight loos much easier, and it will benefit every other aspect of their health as well.

Sometimes if a dog has been on a kibble or canned food for a long period of time they are lacking the beneficial bacteria and enzymes in their gut micro-biome. Supplementing probiotics and enzymes, or feeding foods like raw green tripe to  replenish and balance their gut can help with weight loss as well.

(2) Exercise

Be sure your dog is getting an ample amount of exercise in their day. Many dogs are lacking the amount of exercise they should get. There are so many ways to help your pet get active, whether a walk, a run, swimming, hiking, playing with other dogs, playing with you, and much more. There are so many things you can do to get your pet moving.  You can get creative here.

There are many interactive toys available to help get your pet physically and mentally stimulated on days you may be extra busy, such as treat balls to roll around the house. “Wait, treats?!” Again, be sure you account for any treats at meal time and be sure they are minimally processed treats such as freeze dried or dehydrated treats, limited ingredients such as a single protein source, so that they do not hinder your weight loss goals.

You can also check out dog training facilities and try out some dog sports like agility, flyball, canine freestyle, disc dog, or dock diving to get your dog moving and having fun. If your dog is older or has joint issues, you can look into a lower impact activity like nose work or barn hunt (some jumping).

If your pet is already at their ideal weight, thank you so much for looking out for your pet’s health and wellness. If you realize your pet is overweight after reading this article, start your plan and make it your number one priority to get your pet to a healthy weight.

Dr. Erin O’Connor is an AVCA Animal Chiropractor and ACAN Naturopathic Carnivore Nutrition Consultant. She sees patients out of her clinic, Vitality Chiropractic Center in Aurora, as well as Autumn Green Animal Hospital in Geneva. For further information, visit myvitalitychiropractic.com or email Dr. O’Connor at drerinoconnor@myvitalitychiropractic.com.

 

 

When a client calls me on the phone and describes their dog as “aggressive,” I have my own picture in my head of what aggression looks like. But what is their picture? What exactly does aggressive look like to them? So I ask.  And I ask a very specific question.

“How do you know? What exactly does your dog’s reactivity look like that makes you think this?”

Did you see what I did there? I changed their word “aggression” to “reactivity” because the bottom line is, the dog is simply reacting to a stimulus. The severity of the reactivity is what I’m trying to find out.

“My neighbor came over and my dog jumped on her and barked” VERSES “My husband was in the ER because our dog bit him.”

I never give advice about reactivity/aggression over the phone. Not until I see it in person, I need too much additional information before I can begin. However, there is some information that I can give that is an overview no matter what or how severe the reactivity is.

Reactivity is mostly fear-based. I would even go as far as to say 99% of all aggression cases are based and rooted in fear or they started there even if they have morphed into something else today.
The humans frequently make the reactive behavior worse on accident because of how they react. You should become aware of how you react and everything you do. This includes your voice and your body language.

Threshold. No matter how reactive the dog is, no matter what the dog is reacting to, no matter the location where the dog is reacting, the dog cannot have his mind changed about anything unless he is under threshold. The dog must be in a position to learn. Once a dog has reached the height of his reactivity, it is too late to train or learn, the only option then is management. Begin implementing training under threshold. This usually means distance from stimuli. Distance is always your best friend.

Counter Conditioning. When a dog is reactive, the dog has already made a decision about how he feels about the stimulus. That’s why he is reacting! Changing how the dog feels about the stimulus is the most common, and often, the easiest technique. Associate a positive interaction with the aversive. Present a beloved chewy water bottle as you need to pass another dog on a leash.  Allow the dog to begin to associate happy things happen when the bad things enters the scene.

Incompatible Behaviors/Replacement Behaviors. IBs teach the dog to do something that causes him to be physically unable to do the unwanted behavior and RBs are performing a wanted behavior instead of an unwanted one. For example, it is physically impossible for a dog to jump if he is sitting. This same idea can be used with reactivity. Replace lunging at the end of the leash with eye contact to you. Or train the dog that a tight leash is a cue to find you so if he does reach the end of his leash, he is able to cue himself out of lunging!

Be a Detective. Why is your dog reacting? Sometimes if you can find the root, you can fix the problem. Most of the time we don’t have the originating situation to cause this but sometimes we do know! A client called me recently about their dog now displacing reactivity to anything that beeps. But she also knows the exact moment it happened! The dog was home all day when the smoke alarm battery started chirping. The dog now associated the obnoxious noise with being afraid and fear turns into “aggression.”

Earlier the better. The sooner you can recognize there is a fear or reactivity starting, the easier and quicker it can be reversed!

No practicing. Practice makes perfect so every time the dog gets to practice the reactive behavior, it gets better and stronger and more default. Management and prevention can play a huge part in reversing a guarding behavior.

Don’t hesitate to consult a positive reinforcement trainer or your veterinarian for more information.

 

 

 

Since I’ve been away on my Mommy Sabbatical, my colleagues have been telling me they have seen an increase in a behavior commonly referred to as Resource Guarding. This is when a dog finds something valuable and wants to protect it from the humans or other dogs or pets. The behaviors can look as minimal as walking away with the valuable item or can be as severe as biting. This behavior is unwanted by us but still totally normal and not a dog trying to claim a status of dominance.

There are some things all owners should be doing and not doing to prevent resource guarding with the family dog! If your dog is already showing signs of Resource Guarding, have hope that it is a changeable behavior. There are a few things to keep in mind.

Resource Guarding DO:

Do an exchange with your dog for everything to take. Take a toy, give a treat. Take a stuffed KONG, give a toy. Etc. The mistake made is “I’m your master,” when in fact your dog is just interpreting you as a jerk and learns to guard instead. This is most helpful when a puppy or dog is new to a family.

Do leave your dog alone when eating meals or snacks other than dropping goodies. Always and forever.

Do prevent the opportunity to guard. Separate multiple dogs food bowls and chew toys. Always and forever.

Do train your dog. Training as many behaviors as possible gives your dog default options to offer you to gain access to things they want. It’s important to include a drop and leave it in the mix of behaviors.

Resource Guarding DON’T:

Don’t put your hands in your dog’s food bowl while he eats. Can you imagine if a restaurant server stood at your table with his hands on your plate?!? Just leave the dog alone unless you’re dropping an extra yummy in.

Don’t take anything from your dog and walk off.

Don’t allow you dog access to things he can guard.

Resource Guarding CHANGING BEHAVIOR:

Do have your dog work for everything. No free handouts.  All food, treats, and toys require eye contact, sit or down behavior.

Do hand-feed. Hand-feed can come from your actual hands or from a pouring container. Ask your dog for eye contact or a sit and pour a small amount into their bowl. When the dog finishes, ask for behaviors and pour a small amount, repeat. Include high value food into their diet when your dog automatically begins to offer these behaviors.

Do train a give release or drop cue.

Do train a leave it or off cue.

Do make yourself valuable so your dog knows that when you are around, good things happen and less guarding will “need” to exist.

Don’t punish or challenge a dog displaying resource guarding.

And don’t hesitate to contact a positive reinforcement trainer or your veterinarian for questions or additional help!

You can contact Amber Walker at (630) 53-PUPPY, amber@aitrainers.com or visit her website www.aitrainers.com

 

 

 

 

untitledCanine massage is a helpful and simple way to make your dog feel and move better.  Massage is a calming and very effective treatment modality that brings each pet into better range of motion and facilitates healing. Properly functioning muscles can lead to a whole new level of mobility and health.

A Nationally Certified Canine Massage Therapist is a person that has fulfilled a required number of hours being educated in anatomy, physiology, behavior, gait assessment, palpation, massage techniques, body systems, passive range of motion and injury and tissue repair. The National Board of Certification for Animal Acupressure and Massage has a standardized exam, not required to practice but ideal to obtain to set yourself apart as a practitioner.

In addition to regular veterinary care, canine massage can help so many of our pets. Let’s review some reasons why massage is right for your pooch.

  • Muscle imbalance or overuse from too much or not enough exercise
  • Anxiety from storms, holidays, or other transitions (moving, new baby, etc.)
  • Pre- and post-surgery (pain relief before and after surgical intervention)
  • Edema relief (decrease swollen area after injury or surgical intervention)
  • Hip dysplasia or Arthritis and other debilitating diseases
  • Amputee (scar therapy at amputation site, remove fascial adhesions)
  • Recent adoptee (self-confidence issues)
  • Lymphatic drainage (removes toxins and improves immune system)
  • Pain reduction in general (the brain releases feel good hormones during massage)
  • Stress reliever (massage decreases stress hormones)
  • Restores energy and vitality
  • Puppies (tumbles and falls, handling awareness)
  • Basic stretching (create elasticity throughout tight, shortened muscles)
  • Pairs well with homeopathy, acupuncture, reiki, and chiropractic care
  • Palliative or hospice care (brings peace and comfort during this time)

What to look for…

img_6930Here are some things to check for at home to see if your dog would benefit from a massage:

  1. Do a light, open hand scan over the dog’s entire body. Here you are searching for areas of tight muscle, heat, lack of heat and swelling. Gently apply pressure to these areas to check for discomfort. Pulling away or turning to look at you are indications they may have an area of concern. Over time, your pet will allow you to check them, and you will become more sensitized to the slightest change.
  2. Observe your pet as they go through specific movements. Observe your dog while he walks. Is he dragging his nails on the back feet? Does he have a head bob when moving one of the front legs forward? Does he hop up the stairs or make contact with all feet? Does he have difficulty going into a sit or stand? Can your dog squat or lift his leg to potty comfortably or is he weak? These can all be indications there is muscular or joint pain occurring.

Massage is a medication free option that can be right for your pet.  A directory of skilled Nationally Certified Canine Massage Therapists is available at nbcaam.org.

For further information on canine massage visit myvitalitychiropractic.com or email Kristina Dodge at kristinadodge@ymail.com

 

 

“Hi Amber, it’s “Noel.” I am on vacation this week and was browsing the Internet and found a cute puppy’s picture at the animal shelter.  I’m going to head over there and pick her up.  I don’t know anything about this breed, can you tell me before I go?”

cute-dogFirst, I’m grateful Noel called me first.  More often than not, I get the call once things aren’t going well about a week or two after adoption or purchase.  After a few questions of Noel’s lifestyle, habits, and honest reasons for wanting this particular puppy, we decided together this dog was *not* a good fit for her.

Unfortunately, a lot of pet purchases and adoptions are made from “really cute pictures online.” Don’t get me wrong, cute dogs sell!  My Instagram page is devoted to cute dog pictures with plenty of followers!  Plus, my next dog is likely a yellow Labrador and I will check out the Internet to see who is out there.  Then make meet and greet appointments based on availability and pictures. Where this goes wrong is “what a cute face! Let’s bring this one home!” Not all breeds are created equal.

Breed research is vitally important before bringing home a dog.  It is truly necessary to match a dog’s breed to your lifestyle. Unfortunately, breed behavior can conflict with owner expectations and management. Though the dog will vary on an individual basis, you should make yourself aware of what their genetic DNA programming is.

Generally, breeds can look like this:

Herding
Job: ability to control movement of livestock
Turns into: easy arousal of movement including children and cars

Workingnational-dog-day
Job: various tasks, guarding, pulling sleds, search and rescue, police, military
Turns into: Resource guarding, protective of person or property, excessive leash pulling.

Hound
Job: Hunt using scent, sight, and speed
Turns into: distracted by smells and easily lose attention to owner, chasing.

Terrier
Job: Hunt and kill vermin
Turns into: Digging, chasing, killing rodents in yard or home such as hamsters and guinea pigs.

Sporting
Job: assist humans with hunting by pointing and retrieving.
Turns into: Carrying things in their mouths like laundry and shoes, possible destruction of items.

Amber WalkerSo, before you bring home the next “OMG that dog is so cute!!!!!,” a little breed research can make or break the happiness and compatibility success of both your family and dog!

Amber Walker is the owner of Animal Intuitions, you can contact her at (630) 53-PUPPY or amber@aitrainers.com or visit her website at www.aitrainers.com.

 

 

 

Amber WalkerIf you have read my Blogs from 2013 (Ask the Trainer ~ Baby Time and And the Baby Came Home: Helping Dogs Adjust to a New Baby), you’ll recall my dog’s initial reaction to bringing home Baby K was to immediately return the baby back to the hospital for a full refund!

Now in 2016, Baby Z is 3 months old and the experience couldn’t have been more different!  I’m glad my Labrador gave me the learning of being difficult the first time around and then a “been there, done that” mentality for Round 2 <wink>

Regardless of how your dog accepts your first, second, third or more babies, there are always a few things that are still good practice!

Prepare ahead of time:

Keep the routine as close as possible to being the same.  This includes meal times, walks, etc.

Do as much training before the baby comes as possible.  If dog’s behaviors are already fairly well in place, brush up on everything to make sure they are sharp.  Train replacement behaviors for the dog’s unwanted behaviors or create management plans for the dog. For example, I chose to put up a window film to prevent barking at dogs on the sidewalk of our very busy, dog-friendly community.

Preparing Dog For Baby, Newborn (6)Brush up on recognizing normal healthy dog stress signals (like yawn, lip lick, whale eye, body shakes, etc.) so you’ll be able to recognize when they are stressed and adjust the environment. (Guest Blog: Dog-Friendly Families: Body Language for more on stress signals)

If you’ll be utilizing a dog daycare or neighborly friend to help watch the dog, research or arrange that ahead of time.  My dog spent 2 weeks at my in-laws house only making short visits home to see us and meet baby Z. After 2 weeks, we had a better idea of how to manage 2 kids and Hadley was wore out from her 2 week vacation.  She was a fabulous dog once she “moved back home.” We did not do this for Hadley when Baby K was born and I regretted that, especially seeing how well it helped her get use to Baby Z.  I highly recommend letting someone else care for your dog while the new parents adjust.

As baby gifts arrive, put them where the dog can smell and investigate.  Nothing like bringing home hundreds of dollars of new stuff and a baby all at the same time.

There must be a baby-free zone option for the dog.  They must have a place they can get away to without anyone bothering them. This can be a bed or crate in a separate room.  Teach all the humans that that when the dog goes here, leave the dog alone.

After the baby arrives:

Go slow.  Your dog and baby do not have to be best buds in the first 20 minutes.  Allow your dog to sniff baby feet, blankets, cribs, etc. at their own pace.  Don’t force the dog by dragging or restraining them.dog-and-baby-600x379

Lower your criteria and expectations.  The excess crying (by both baby and post-partum mama!) plus lack of sleep, puts everyone on edge, even Fido. Don’t expect perfect behaviors from your dog during these stressful changes.

Bring a blanket home from the hospital for the dog to sniff.

Put a cup of kibble in every room in the house.  Just do it, and you’ll thank me later!

Try not to get mad at the dog.  They could be as stressed as the new parents are and yelling will only add to the stress.

Visitors and gusts may not be stressful, even if they never were before.

Congratulations and good luck!!

For more information or questions contact Amber at amber@aitrainers.com, or visit her website at www.aitrainers.com.